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New Peugeot e-2008 2020 review

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28 Nov, 2019 6:00am Alex Ingram

We find out if the new Peugeot e-2008 is good enough to cash in on the electric SUV craze

A couple of months after UK customers receive their petrol and diesel-powered Peugeot 2008s, sales of the all-electric version will commence. So will the promise of silent, zero-emission driving make it worth the wait?

The e-2008 rides on the same CMP platform to the conventional alternatives, and little has changed elsewhere, either; there’s the same gorgeous interior, the same soft-touch plastics, and the same wonderful digital dials – potentially obstructed by the same small steering wheel.

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In fact, the design team has left only subtle superficial hints that hint to its plug-in powertrain. From the front, the grille gets a colour-coded design, which bears a blueish-green Peugeot lion at its centre. There’s subtle ‘e’ badging along the side, too, while inside, the GT Line trim gets a unique grey Alcantara seat upholstery. The charging socket sits in place of the fuel filler cap.

Under the skin, the 2008 uses a single electric motor making 134bhp and 260Nm. With no laggy gearbox to overcome, it means that the e-2008 produces lively performance. The power delivery is wonderfully smooth, too, and the motor is near-silent and free of vibration.

Interior and boot space are unaffected by the electric drivetrain, as the 50kWh battery pack is split into three main sections: the central transmission tunnel, and beneath the front and rear seats. Full charging specs have yet to be confirmed, but with the drivetrain matching the e-208 supermini, expect a 10-80 per cent charge to take 30 minutes with a 100kW charger, and around eight-hours with a 7.4kW home charger.

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Peugeot e-2008 - rear

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At 1,548kg, the e-2008 weighs over 300kg more than petrol and diesel versions. The suspension has been retuned to cope with the extra weight, and while it still handles well, it’s not quite as agile as petrol variants. The ride is still smooth for the most part, but the extra mass tends to bounce a little more over uneven surfaces. This is only something you’d really notice if you drive petrol and electric back to back, though.

Thanks to the MyPeugeot app, living with the EV should be pretty straightforward. It lets owners pre-condition the cabin temperature and remotely check the car’s charging status through their smartphone. It’ll also let users pre-set recharging times – perfect for making use of cheaper overnight electricity tariffs, when demand on the grid is reduced.

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While the prices of petrol and diesel versions of the 2008 are rather steep, the e-2008 seems like pretty good value. Once the £3,500 government grand is factored in, prices start from £28,150 for the entry-level Active trim, climbing to £34,275 for the top spec GT. When you consider that the current entry point to the Hyundai Kona electric lineup is £35,100, that’s really quite tempting – as long as the Peugeot’s more modest range will be adequate for you.

4 Peugeot realises that EVs aren’t for everyone, which is why it offers petrol, diesel and electric versions of its 2008. But while combustion versions are pricey, the e-2008 represents relatively good value against its closest rivals. It can’t quite match the range or performance of the Hyundai Kona Electric, but it counters with a more pleasant drive and a stunning interior.

  • Model: Peugeot e-2008 GT Line
  • Price: £32,000
  • Engine: Single electric motor, 50kWh battery
  • Power/torque: 136bhp/260Nm
  • Transmission: Single-speed auto, front-wheel drive
  • 0-62mph: 9.0 seconds (est)
  • Top speed: 93mph
  • Range: 199 miles
  • On sale: April 2020

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